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Press and Internet Review, All about the PSG in English (Only Articles, No Comments)
Miles
posté 31/03/2012 15:33
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Kärcher was not exactly excited about the free publicity, and sent, as the New York Times reports, letters to all 12 French presidential candidates in 2007 asking them not to use the brand name when discussing what should be done in the French suburbs.

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Kadvael
posté 18/07/2012 10:36
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Here is an article about the PSG business. There are interesting figures and trends and it shows what are the needed improvements to comply with the financial fair play rules.

Edit: it is also already discussed in the Qatari shareholder topic.
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laleto
posté 19/07/2012 04:58
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^^That is an incredibly well researched article!



From ESPN, an article covering the Zlatan deal.
But the most incredible part is that it comes with a 20 minute video discussion from their panel, on Zlatan, on PSG, on the FFP, as well as the ripple effect on the transfer market as a consequence of the Zlatan-Silva pack.

The photo of Zlatan juggling his ball at the Trocadero with the Eiffel Tower behind him is being posted worldwide, that is the exposure in terms of image and publicity that PSG wanted in this huge signing, and it is priceless for the club and the owners.
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Kadvael
posté 19/07/2012 12:00
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IBRACADABRA
The only French club ever to win Big Cup took a direct approach to buying success, deciding that paying opposition players to throw matches was ultimately cheaper than paying great players to win them. blessure.gif Although Marseille were only found guilty of bribing their way to the domestic title in 1991, their subsequent Big Cup triumph was inevitably tainted by the almighty pong emanating from Bernard Tapie and his lackeys. So really, no French club has ever sat on the European throne without leaving skidmarks. That, however, may be about to change: because Paris Saint-Germain are emerging as the biggest threat to come out of France since Obelix the Gaul, funded, as they are, by Middle Eastern blokes who were born in vast cauldrons full of the magic potion that is cash.

When Qatar Sports Investment hitched themselves to PSG last year they immediately launched into a WAGesque spending spree that included the €42m purchase of Javier Pastore from Palermo. But, as if to show that the new owners respected the traditions of the club, PSG somehow managed to bungle their bounty and only finished second in Ligue 1 last season laugh.gif, behind humble Montpellier. That, however, was merely a prelude for an even more lavish spree: thus today PSG, having failed with January bids for Carlos Tevez, David Beckham and Alexandre Pato, announced the capture of a genuine star of world football, as Zlatan Ibrahimovic was unveiled as the new king of the Parc des Princes, lured from Milan along with Brazil defender Thiago Silva for a combined fee of nearly €60m.

"I have come to PSG to win, not for anything else," hurrahed the Swede, who will earn a reported annual salary of £12m after tax, which suggests that, unless he has hired Jimmy Carr's accountant, his gross pay will be above £30m. "I don't know much about Ligue 1 but Ligue 1 knows who I am," he Ibraed while club officials, who have also signed Ezequiel Lavezzi and hot Italian prospect Marco Verrati this summer, trumpeted their determination to "win trophies and do well in [Big Cup]".

All of this leaves erstwhile top dogs Lyon begging from crumbs from the lofty new Parisian table. "I am convinced that it is in PSG's best interests to make sure that Lyon is a high-calibre challenger," whimpered Lyon panhandler-in-chief Jean-Michel Aulas. "I say to them: 'help us, lend us some players'." Aulas has his eyes on two players in particular – Mamadou Sakho and Clément Chantôme – but PSG are expected to offer him nothing but two gold-laden fingers.

Guardian
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Myrmidon
posté 19/07/2012 12:22
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Ibrahimovic completes PSG move

Three-year deal in Paris as Swedish striker leaves Milan





Paris St Germain have confirmed the signing of Zlatan Ibrahimovic from AC Milan on a three-year contract.

PSG are reported to have paid the Rossoneri around €20million (£15.7m) for the services of the striker.

Ibrahimovic becomes the second Milan player in the space of a week to sign for the Ligue 1 side, following Brazilian defender Thiago Silva to the Parc de Princes.

Although the 30-year-old Sweden international is often seen as a mercurial talent, his record shows he is one of the most reliable goalscorers in Europe, having hit more than 20 goals in each of the last five seasons.

That period includes spells at Inter Milan, Barcelona and AC Milan and his capture indicates the growing power of PSG in the European transfer market.


Dream

"I want to thank Paris Saint-Germain and (sporting director) Leonardo for the great work they've done," Ibrahimovic told reporters at a Paris press conference on Wednesday.

"I think they've made something that looked impossible, possible. I'm very happy to be sitting here. After lots of talks, I'm finally a PSG player. It's a big step in my career, another dream come true.

"I think this is a very interesting project and I had no doubts. In my mind I was very clear, and I knew what I wanted.

"I want to be part of this club's history and I'm pretty sure we will make history. I came here to win, not for anything else, and I'm pretty sure we'll win some trophies."

"I'm joining a dream team. They'll do everything to win and I want to be part of it. They already have some great players.

"And they've bought the best defender in the world, Thiago Silva. As long as I have him behind me, I don't need to look back.

"They're bringing together the very best. Who wouldn't want to be here?"

Choice

There had been speculation that Ibrahimovic had been forced out of Milan as part of Silvio Berlusconi's cost-cutting measures but the player himself refutes those claims.

"No-one at Milan influenced me," he added. "It was my choice and my choice alone.

"I was very happy to be at Milan. They gave me my smile back.

"It's a club that will stay in my heart. They helped me and my family, and I don't want to put a shadow over my time there.

"They made it easy for me to come to PSG so I thank them and I wish them all the best."

Ibrahimovic is the fourth player to have joined the club from Serie A this summer, after Thiago Silva, Argentine forward Ezequiel Lavezzi, and 19-year-old midfielder Marco Verratti.

But Leonardo insists that the acquisition of Ibrahimovic represents the end of the club's summer spending.

"The market is closed for new arrivals," he said. "With Zlatan we've finished in the transfer window this year."


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macbath
posté 09/08/2012 02:37
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Citation
PSG is primed to dominate Ligue 1

When France's Ligue 1 kicks off this weekend, it will likely attract more attention than any Championnat since the early 1990s, when Marseille ruled the roost and Monaco was led by a lanky, bespectacled young manager named Arsene Wenger.

Now you have Paris St. Germain, whose net spend in the past 15 months is around a quarter of a billion (with a "B") dollars. And if recent reports linking PSG to Lucas Moura are to be believed, it could go even higher. In terms of financial muscle, it's on a par with anyone in Europe right now.

Of course, it takes more than economic might to achieve success. And while Ezequiel Lavezzi, Thiago Silva and Zlatan Ibrahimovic -- added to last year's newcomers Thiago Motta, Javier Pastore, Jeremy Menez, Alex and Salvatore Sirigu -- mean that manager Carlo Ancelotti now has a powerhouse at his disposal, there's a long way to go before the gap with the likes of Barcelona, Real Madrid, Bayern and the Manchester clubs is closed.


PSG manager Carlo Ancelotti has a powerhouse at his disposal, including new arrivals Ezequiel Lavezzi, Thiago Silva and Zlatan Ibrahimovic.
How and if the pieces fit together and whether Ancelotti can make them click remains to be seen and is, perhaps, a column for another time. (Personally, I think few managers can match the former Milan boss when it comes to extracting the best from a group of big-name superstars.) What's interesting here, though, is whether PSG can lift the rest of the French league or whether being in Le Championnat turns out to be a bit of a millstone.

Marseille and Lyon, which historically ought to be PSG's rivals for the title, are treading water. Both are in tricky positions financially and both have played "small ball" in the transfer window. Elie Baup, who replaces the French national team-bound Didier Deschamps, will be working with the same set of players who collapsed so dramatically late last year (two league wins after January). There's no reason to think he's going to do any better. Lyon, once the gold standard of good governance, spent most of the summer trying to get rid of its high earners so they could be replaced with cheaper youngsters. Kim Kallstrom and Ederson moved on; Aly Cissokho and Michel Bastos have not, at least for now.

The one club that has tried to push on is Lille, for which coach Rudi Garcia has performed annual miracles and remains one of the most underrated bosses around. Last season, after winning the title in 2010-11, Lille lost Gervinho, Moussa Sow, Adil Rami and Yoann Cabaye, yet still managed to finish third. This summer, it was Eden Hazard's turn to make tracks, yet with Marvin Martin and Salomon Kalou coming aboard you feel Garcia can pull off another minor miracle and keep Lille in the running. With a new 50,000-seat stadium opening soon, Lille could soon have the financial clout to actually hang on to its stars and, perhaps, even get in PSG's way.

Then, of course, there's the defending champion, tiny Montpellier, whose fairytale run to the title last year was Disneyesque, given its puny budget. With the big target man, Olivier Giroud, off to Arsenal and defensive stalwart Mapou Yanga-Mbiwa possibly also on his way, it's hard to see lightning striking twice.

On paper, it looks as if only Lille can stand in PSG's way, and even then it's a long shot. The question, though, is whether this will be good for the French league in the medium term. And the answer is far from clear.

Having a big spender around can lead to a classic trickle-down effect, with Qatari money finding its way, via PSG, to the rest of the clubs. The problem is, since the Qataris took over and installed Leonardo as director of football, PSG has done its spending abroad, mostly in Serie A. At the same time, PSG's presence is likely to lead to wage inflation, which is never a good thing for the competition.

Speaking of wages, there's another huge, dark cloud on the horizon.

Francois Hollande, France's president, has vowed to impose a 75 percent tax rate on anyone earning more than a million euros ($1.25 million) a year. And while millionaire footballers generally don't rank very high on anyone's sympathy list, it's bound to hit Ligue 1 hard. Many players either negotiate their contracts in net (after-tax) terms or have clauses that protect them from sudden spikes in income tax. (And those who don't will make their feelings known as soon as it's time to renegotiate their deals.)

Currently, a footballer's take-home pay in France is around 50 percent of his gross wages. Bump the tax rate to 75 percent and you don't need to be a genius to figure out the havoc it could wreak. A guy making $5 million gross a season will need to nearly double his pre-tax wage to around $10 million to get the same net paycheck as before.

PSG, of course, can seemingly absorb the tax shock without batting an eyelid (there are major Financial Fair Play implications, but it seems as if they'll cross that bridge when they get to it). It's a different matter for the rest of the league. A 75 percent top tax rate is obviously a political decision, and this is a sports column, so I'll leave it to others to debate its merits. But one undeniable side effect is that it will hit the French game hard.

Possibly hard enough to negate some of the beneficial effects of the recent investments, including the building and refurbishment of new grounds ahead of Euro 2016 and the big TV deal with Al Jazeera. And that suggests that even if PSG attain success domestically and in Europe, we may not have that rising tide lifting all boats.


ESPN
http://espn.go.com/sports/soccer/story/_/i...-france-ligue-1
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Varino
posté 13/08/2012 09:04
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laleto
posté 16/08/2012 19:22
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An interesting article in the sense that it makes some valid criticisms, but unfortunately rendered null by the fact he makes several mistakes in his arguments (such as the pass to Matuidi or some of Ancelotti's choices given the squad at his disposal).

What I'll say is, I don't know whether he'll fit in better amongst some of Culturepsg's members or over at omplanete.


Citation
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
Croissants and raw minced beef
Alexander Netherton

Paris Saint-Germain have begun this season as they finished the last: inexplicably muddled given the talent and time afforded to get their house in order. They have now adopted the necessary pose for the modern moneyed club with flags and goal music, the epitome of football's public enemy. PSG: nouveau nouveau riche. It was more evident where the fans were concerned than it was in the football as they offered up a confusing performance to draw 2-2 with Lorient at the Parc des Princes on Saturday night.

They started, as every petroteam must, with a smattering of new players on the pitch. Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Marco Verratti and Ezequiel Lavezzi all started, and all played as if they'd barely met any of their new colleagues in pre-season. Understandable to an extent but, for PSG, it was a depressing memory of the performances after the first transfer window under their new owners, bringing in Jeremy Menez, Javier Pastore and Diego Lugano, and their second, inexplicably buying Alex and Maxwell, two fundamentally bad defenders. PSG: deja deja vu.

This was overseen by Carlo Ancelotti, beginning what should - Leonardo permitting - be his first full season as PSG manager. The first half was a debacle. Maxwell scored an own goal in the first few minutes after Lorient waltzed into the penalty area. PSG then pressed ineffectively, using Zlatan Ibrahimovic as an ersatz Andy Carroll, rubbing him up the wrong way by asking him to chase one inaccurate long ball after another. Problems integrating several expensive new signings? So far so Chelsea. As the half ended 2-0, the uglier side of a new sense of entitlement was expressed. The fans booed their team off. At half-time. In the first game of the season. It's perfectly justified to boo a perceived moral slight from one of your players - see Manchester United fans booing Wayne Rooney - but to boo a team after less than an hour betrays an understanding of football that would shame even Gary Lineker. [blessure.gif x1]

Ancelotti had faffed his way to an effective front three after six months of toil last year in Nene, Pastore and Menez, but then started with just Menez. It was only when Nene was introduced in central midfield for Marco Verratti that the side started playing at a level that may be deemed vaguely commensurate with their abilities. It's too soon to judge the potential of the team, clearly, but it's fair to suggest that the manager remains ignorant of his best team [blessure.gif x2]. With neither of the Thiago twins - Silva and Motta - available, he doesn't have the luxury of finding a settled side for a couple of months at least.

With a few choice words from Ancelotti, the players started with not just a new intent but also gave the impression that they had at least remembered they were playing football. Ibrahimovic scored a little after an hour. This was, however, not a good moment for PSG. Granted, they had halved their lead and were playing with a verve that suggested that future opposition should likely have more to worry about over the course of an entire game, but it led to something horrific. Goal music. There is little that is not cloying about the rise of a club newly buff purely from financial doping, but it's not just the instant head start - it's the soulless branding. Goal music is bad enough, but before the game they provided jaunty little flags to every fan. Hang soul or atmosphere, let them wave flags. PSG used to have hooligans; now they have the Black Eyed Peas and cheap tat. [blessure.gif x3 to infinity]

It's not all decline. PSG used to have a mardy Nicolas Anelka in attack but now they have the markedly superior mardy Ibrahimovic [blessure.gif]. He began the game isolated but transformed himself into a sonic Dimitar Berbatov in the second half. He controlled one hoofed ball that had been sailing 12 feet in the air with an outstretched toe to start one attack, and finally sealed the game not just by converting a penalty, but with a through-ball that compelled the defender to bundle Blaise Matuidi over to win it. An injury-time equaliser, a second goal from their new superstar, with time left to win the game, and what do the fans do? Leave early to get a jump on the traffic. [blessure.gif]

Ibrahimovic's performance sums up what he may bring to the side. Not on his team-mates' wavelength in the first half, he only made a difference when he took it upon himself to control the game. If PSG are to not only win the league but make some impression in the Champions League this year, his contribution will have to be as driver rather than passenger. This is less to do with the team lacking goalscorers - Pastore, Nene, Menez and Lavezzi can all help here - but because the defence remains patchy.

Nicolas Douchez replaced Salvatore Sirigu, probably PSG's most consistent player last season, in yet another example of the inscrutable selections from Ancelotti. Possibly to be sold before the transfer window ends, Mamadou Sakho looked to be treading water instead of developing last year, and in the process lost the trust of his manager. Diego Lugano meanwhile looked like he was treading through concrete in his first year. Alex is just denser than concrete. Either side of them, Maxwell was sold by Barcelona even while Eric Abidal prepared for a liver transplant - the kind of endorsement best left to the second page of the CV - and Cristophe Jallet's massive bald head attracts even more attention to his inability to cross or pass. [Boom! Headshot combo! blessure.gif]

PSG are the club that had to buy their own furniture. They did it in the '70s, and they're doing it again. PSG will still probably win the league. Last year's winners Montpellier are a marginally weaker side, and nobody else is particularly impressive. The rub is: if they win the league peppered with giddy little tunes and flags, and a carousel policy instead of a rotation one, that won't be particularly impressive either.




http://soccernet.espn.go.com/columns/story...germain?cc=5901
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